Now that you know how to make extra money, try a few of these (or all 30) and see if you can generate a nice little chunk of change. You can use these ideas no matter what Baby Step you’re on! Take that extra cash you bring in and toss it at your money goals—things like paying off debt, saving up for your emergency fund, or putting a little extra toward retirement. With extra dollars in your pocket you’ll be kicking major butt on your goals in no time!
My next self-funded business hit $160,000 in revenue in its first year alone. After that first taste of self-made success, I’ve gone on to sign consulting contracts worth tens of thousands of dollars with startups like LinkedIn and Google, launch profitable online courses, and grow my blog to over 400,000 monthly readers and $50,000/mo in side income.

Are you an animal lover at heart? How about making some extra money just by taking a dog for a walk or boarding a cat for the weekend? You can advertise your own pet-sitting business on social media, put up signs throughout your neighborhood, or use a website like Rover. They let you set your schedule and adjust your fees as you see fit. If you do use Rover, keep in mind that they take a cut of what you make.3
Sites like Zyoin and WiseStep connect employers with prospective employees, many of whom are already employed and not actively job-hunting via networking. The main benefit is knowing who these qualified candidates are. Rewards for referring a candidate who gets hired range from $50 to potentially several thousand dollars. If you know a stream of job-seekers, you can break into the recruiting business without up-front or overhead costs.
That’s where you — the Facebook ads specialist — can come in. If you learn how to effectively run campaigns and generate leads for a local small businesses, you can earn anywhere from $1,000 – $2,000 per month per client. You don’t need to have a degree or prior experience in the field to get started, and as your portfolio of clients expands, you can start to up your rates and charge more.
 @LauraGesicki I disagree Laura. Technology can only let an individual go so far with design. It all starts with the thought process and possessing the “designer eye.” This “eye” cannot be taught, but is rather a natural talent and ability to recognize good design from bad. Technology is merely a tool to display our ideas. Nothing beats natural talent and creativity.
Disagree with the photography idea. It may seem easy but there are those of us who have spent, in my case 10 + years learning the light, the technical aspects, the right way to pose… we have to keep pushing our prices higher because there are more people starting to eat away at the client base by undercutting…. and we’re trying to make money and feed families too. It only hurts an industry to undercut. Sorry. Good list otherwise, don’t do it as an expense to others.

You can potentially make even more money by offering to handle snow removal in the winter. Shoveling snow is often a homeowner’s least favorite job, and there are many homeowners who simply cannot handle their own shoveling because of physical limitations. Typically, snow removal companies charge a flat fee for the winter, no matter how many times it snows.
Not only will this multiply the money you’re bringing in in a serious way, but it protects you against any sudden changes in the market or in your business. Remember that old saying about putting all your eggs in one basket? A few hours a week committed to just one or two of the following opportunities will put you in a much stronger position to be financially safe and independent.
It’s best to use a platform like Airbnb, which can easily connect your listing to renters. It also takes care of scheduling and payment processing; gives you the opportunity to build credibility through reviews (which will make renting out your space even easier in the future!); and protects you by verifying guests and covering every booking with $1M in property damage protection.
To get started, create a listing by filling out a description, take and upload photos of your space, and set a price. Your listing helps guests get a sense of what your place is like. Then, set the dates the space will be available and draft your house rules. Once your listing is live, guests can book their stay at your home, and you start earning money.
Sites like Share-A-Sale and Amplifinity provide referral fees. Vendors set the referral fees they're willing to pay and for what services. When the transaction happens, you get paid by the company for introducing a new customer to them. uRefer also allows merchants to set up referral programs for introductions and meetings, in addition to any transactions made.
Freelancing is the next best thing to being paid more for your full-time work, because professional work always pays more than unskilled. To find opportunities, let former colleagues or other personal connections that you’re available for freelance gigs. (Here are some ideas on how LinkedIn could be useful for that.) Or, post on marketplaces particular to your field. For instance, Mediabistro, a journalism site, allows freelancers to post profiles of their experience and services. Though these are more up to chance, designers can bid on jobs at 99Designs.com or submit a design at Threadless, to see if it will be crowdfunded. Elance-Odesk also lists many freelance opportunities, and you can also post your own services on Fiverr, although some freelancers say these services create a race to the bottom on fees and so are not very lucrative. If you're new to freelancing, here's how to set your rates, and here's how to negotiate raises with clients.
The market for drones is expanding. Companies hire out work like aerial inspection, photography and land mapping. So if you’re already a drone enthusiast, why not put your aircraft to work? You first need to register it with the Federal Aviation Administration and obtain a license from them for commercial use. Then, you can apply for gigs as a drone pilot. Learn how to start making money with drones.
Great message, Jeff. When I look at big goals, or even incremental goals, I like to break them down into bite size bits. Earning $100,000 a year seems difficult in many situations, but it seems easier when you break it down to $8,350 a month, or roughly $280 a day. Sure, that is aggressive for many salaries, but there are many ways to fill the gaps with side income, owning a small business, consulting, freelance work, etc. The same concept works for any number or goal you want to reach. Find out where you are, and what it will take to reach the next step. It’s much more attainable when you make incremental goals.
Sites like Share-A-Sale and Amplifinity provide referral fees. Vendors set the referral fees they're willing to pay and for what services. When the transaction happens, you get paid by the company for introducing a new customer to them. uRefer also allows merchants to set up referral programs for introductions and meetings, in addition to any transactions made.

Set up an account on Rover.com. Enjoy furry company once in a while? These days, many professional pet-sitters set up an account on Rover.com. With Rover.com, you can reach people in your area who are actively looking for someone to watch their dogs, cats, hamsters, or turtles, either in their home or your own. You can set your own rules and schedule and come up with your own pricing through the Rover.com pet-sitting platform.

Utilize websites like Payscale.com, Salary.com, and free salary guides from Robert Half and Randstad to find out what a competitive salary might be for someone with your expertise and education in your area. Document everything that you have accomplished at work in the past year and present it to your employer. When you are making an honest case for yourself instead of demanding a raise, your employer will at least consider your request.
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