You can make extra money left and right if you just know where to look. If you like to ‘tinker’ I’d suggest going to the DIY section on Pinterest. You can find thousands of projects there to make, and you can sell them at a nice profit. You can make 20, 30, or 50 bucks at a time, in real money. Not the ‘get rich online now!’ stuff you see around. I make old teapots into lamps, or old shirts into aprons and sell them locally on Kijiji or Craigslist. It’s totally doable. 
Turn your photographs into cash via sites like Fine Art America, which lets you upload your images to sell as prints, t-shirts, phone cases and more. Other marketplaces for photographers include SmugMug, 500px and PhotoShelter. Some sites require a subscription but may provide features ranging from cloud storage to password-protected galleries and a customized website.
 @LauraGesicki I disagree Laura. Technology can only let an individual go so far with design. It all starts with the thought process and possessing the “designer eye.” This “eye” cannot be taught, but is rather a natural talent and ability to recognize good design from bad. Technology is merely a tool to display our ideas. Nothing beats natural talent and creativity.
If you have a truck and trailer and some muscle, then put them to use by launching your own moving or hauling service. While word of mouth could get you a little business, you may want to scope out places like Ikea, where people need help moving large items from the store to their homes. In the moving and hauling business, you can even be paid extra if you will put that bookshelf-in-a-box together for the customer.
If you have deep knowledge of one or more subjects, you can make money teaching online, such as at a site like Udemy.com. Some instructors there are making a lot of money, but many are just making a few thousand dollars a year -- or less. Still, even that can be very helpful. The money you'll make will depend on how many students take your course, which will depend, to some degree, on how in-demand a topic it is, and how well marketed it is. Note that once you do the work to create a course, you can most likely re-use much or all of it later.

For non-tech people (myself included), web design can cause a lot of stress. And stress means opportunity. If you have a knack for web design or web development, you should definitely be capitalizing on it. And since it’s such a foreign concept for many, it can be a really lucrative side hustle. You can find all sorts of gigs on Upwork. To get you started, check out How to Make $5,000+ a Month Building Websites Part-Time.

Monetize a hobby. While some hobbies actually cost money, others can be transformed into a profitable business venture. Ultimately, it depends on what your hobby is and how talented you are. You could turn your love of photography, for example, into a part-time gig taking family portraits and wedding photos or selling prints on Etsy or at arts fairs.
If you’ve got expertise in a certain area, package up your knowledge into an online course and sell it. This has become a very popular business model for online entrepreneurs over the past several years. The two big websites that are used to sell online courses are Udemy and Teachable. Check out this awesome article by Regina on How to Create an Online Course that Sells.
If you’re strapped for cash but want to work on your own schedule, you might want to consider becoming a driver for Uber or Lyft. You can drive as much (or as little) as you want and set your own schedule. Plus, you get the added bonus of having interesting conversations along the way (or, at the very least, some fun stories to tell of your travels with strangers).
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