Now, it’s time to plan out your show. If you’re doing an interview-style show, you’ll now want to start getting some guests involved. You can use your existing social network to reach out to people you already know or are connected with on Twitter or Facebook. You can also head to Medium or Amazon to find authors or experts on topics specific to your niche.
Look into doing call center work, if that appeals to you. Some call-center jobs can be done from your home, making them extra convenient. These jobs don't tend to pay lavishly -- you may only earn $8 to $10 per hour to start -- but even that can be helpful. Work 12 hours per week earning $9 per hour, and that comes to more than $100 per week and more than $5,000 per year. If you have certain special skills, such as those that could let you be a tech support person, you may be able to earn more. Try Googling terms such as "call center jobs" and see what possibilities you find. Typically, you'll need a landline phone and Internet access, at a minimum -- a quiet room in which to work is also good.
If you hook up with a for-hire car parking service (the type hired out for fancy neighborhood parties) you can make some nice cash tips in just a few hours at night and on the weekend, when parties are held. The key here is to do a great job by showing hustle and being super friendly. This was one of the most enjoyable jobs I had during graduate school. Who doesn’t like to drive nice cars?
If you own an automobile then capitalize on it by renting it out whenever you're not using it through sites like Turo and Getaround. If you want to keep your keys, then you can become a driver for either Uber or Lyft. Depending on where you live, you may be able to earn $35 per hour. One final option would be to register your car as an airport shuttle service vehicle and take people to and from the airport.
You'll also need ecommerce software, fulfillment software, worry about warehousing, customer service and refunds. But that's not all. You'll also need traffic. Think search engine optimization, Facebook ads, and other social media campaigns. It is hard work, especially on your own. You could opt for Amazon's platform, which might be an easier route. But, then again, at the end of the day, this is a serious business, which could produce significant profits. So you're either all in or you're not. 
Most of these hustles are actual full time jobs or careers. It is the people in these occupations who need the extra money. And you can’t just set up a dog grooming business out of your home. I have my dog grooming certificate. First off, there is a lot to know so that you don’t damage a dogs body and fur. You need a proper drainage system for the tub. You need safe shampoo. You need a table that is high enough to make it more comfortable for you and the pet. You need like $600 of equipment (and those are just the basics). You need a proper dryer, so the pet doesn’t get hypothermia. You need to know about skin conditions and allergies. You need to know how to clean their ears and clip their nails safely. There is actually something to it. You can harm animals if you don’t practice safe procedures. It’s not as easy as you state. Most of these ideas aren’t.
Become a freelance photographer and sell photos online. If you have a nice DSLR camera and take good photos, do photography sessions or take photos of events, like parties and weddings. As another option, create fine art photos that people may want to hang on their walls, or take stock photos to sell online on sites like iStock Photo, Shutterstock, or Alamy.[15]
It shows your true ignorance by calling someone an idiot. In no way was this thread used to alienate anyone, but merely having a heated discussion of professions and their importance. If you didn’t read my comment correctly, I said…”for example.” I know the difference between graphic design and being a surgeon. Those of you who are obviously majorly left-brained will never understand the creative industry. You’re right, anyone can be a bad designer, or a bad surgeon, or a bad accountant coordinator…etc. That’s why there exists terrible brand identities, malpractice suits, etc as well. All I was saying that the creative industry shouldn’t be held below the threshold of what is real and what is a fake profession. All professions should be respected in their own right. Period.
 @dasjung No doubt! I know this and you know this, and any other highly skilled and educated designer will also know this. But what about the customers? The people who are looking for a logo design with much consideration of price in this economy.  Knowledge and talent expect the monetary reimbursement it deserves, but unless everybody has a trained eye to recognize it, they just aren’t going to dish out the money for it. That is the point I am trying to make. It is like calling the neighborhood handyman instead of  a high cost plumber to fix a small leak.
If you have a nice camera and a good eye, snapping a few photos might be just the thing you need to figure out how to make extra money. You can go as all in with this as you want. Maybe you only shoot family sessions and birthday cake smashes on the weekends. Or maybe you decide to start a business as a wedding photographer! The choice really is up to you. 
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