29. Videos – This could be an entire section on it’s own. Many people have made money by creating YouTube videos. Evan of EvanTube is a kid and he has made millions by creating reviews of products that other kids his age would use. It’s not easy to get views into the millions, but once you do, you’ll start seeing some cash come in. Many bloggers have completely turned to videos to get their point across by starting a video blog.
This is one of the simplest strategies to employ -- just answer an ad for a business that's looking for part-time help. It might be for a job waiting tables or working a cash register, but no matter how unglamorous it might be, it will turn some of your time into money. Working just two four-hour shifts a week at, say, $12 per hour will get you nearly $100 per week -- and about $5,000 per year. You might do even better than that, such as if you wait tables at a fancy eatery and collect some hefty tips.
Freelancing is the next best thing to being paid more for your full-time work, because professional work always pays more than unskilled. To find opportunities, let former colleagues or other personal connections that you’re available for freelance gigs. (Here are some ideas on how LinkedIn could be useful for that.) Or, post on marketplaces particular to your field. For instance, Mediabistro, a journalism site, allows freelancers to post profiles of their experience and services. Though these are more up to chance, designers can bid on jobs at 99Designs.com or submit a design at Threadless, to see if it will be crowdfunded. Elance-Odesk also lists many freelance opportunities, and you can also post your own services on Fiverr, although some freelancers say these services create a race to the bottom on fees and so are not very lucrative. If you're new to freelancing, here's how to set your rates, and here's how to negotiate raises with clients.
A more old-fashioned way to make money renting property is to buy one or more homes to rent out to tenants -- typically for a year at a time. This seems easier -- and more lucrative -- than it often is, as landlords have to pay for maintenance, repairs, property taxes, and insurance, and their cash flow is halted during periods when their property is un-rented. In addition, dealing with tenants can sometimes be troublesome.
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